Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Facility, History, Course, Admission, Campus Complete Full Details

MIT – US Ranking, Tuition Details, Get An Graduate/ Postgraduate Degree/ Diploma full Details

 
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, MIT adopted a European polytechnic university model and stressed laboratory instruction in applied science and engineering. The Institute is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant university, with a campus that extends more than a mile alongside the Charles River. Its influence in the physical sciences, engineering, and architecture, and more recently in biology, economics, linguistics, management, and social science and art, has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world. MIT is often ranked among the world’s top universities.
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Details:
 
Official Website: https://web.mit.edu
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) of History:
i. Foundation and vision:-
Massachusetts General Court had proposed in 1859 to use newly-weighted land for the “protection of art and science” in Back Bay, Boston, but the proposal failed. A charter for the incorporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, proposed by William Barton Rogers, was signed by the governor of Massachusetts on April 10, 1861.
 
The true and only practical thing of a polytechnic school, as I conceive, about teaching, minute details and the art manipulation, which can only be done in the workshop, but the formation of those scientific methods which form the basis And their explanation, as well as, a complete and systematic review of all their major processes and operations in relation to physical laws.
 
ii. Early Developments:-
Two days after the MIT was chartered, the first battle of the Civil War began. After a long time after the war years, the first classes of MIT were organized in 1865 in the Mercantile Building in Boston. The establishment of new institutions was done as a part of the Moril Land-Grant Colleges Act “to promote the liberal and practical education of institutions”, was a “industrial class” and a land-granting school. In 1863 under the same act, The Commonwealth of Massachusetts established the Massachusetts Agricultural College, which was developed as Massachusetts Amherst University. In 1866, the income from sale of land was Bay moved to new buildings.
 
MIT was called informally “Boston Tech”. The institute adopted the model of European Polytechnic University and emphasized on laboratory instruction from an initial date. Despite the old financial problems, the institute saw the development under the leadership of President Francois Amasa Walker in the last two decades of the 19th century. Programs in electrical, chemical, marine and sanitary engineering were introduced, new buildings were constructed and the size of the student community increased to more than a thousand.
 
iii. Curricular Reforms:-
In the 1930s, President Karl Taylor Compton and Vice-President (effectively Provost) Vannevar Bush emphasized the importance of pure sciences like physics and chemistry and reduced the vocational practice required in shops and drafting studios. The Compton reforms “renewed confidence in the ability of the Institute to develop leadership in science as well as in engineering”. Unlike Ivy League schools, MIT catered more to middle-class families, and depended more on tuition than on endowments or grants for its funding. The school was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1934.
 
iv. Defense Research:-
MIT’s involvement in military science surged during World War II. In 1941, Vannevar Bush was appointed head of the federal Office of Scientific Research and Development and directed funding to only a select group of universities, including MIT. Engineers and scientists from across the country gathered at MIT’s Radiation Laboratory, established in 1940 to assist the British military in developing microwave radar. The work done there significantly affected both the war and subsequent research in the area. Other defense projects included gyroscope-based and other complex control systems for gunsight, bombsight, and inertial navigation under Charles Stark Draper’s Instrumentation Laboratory; the development of a digital computer for flight simulations under Project Whirlwind; and high-speed and high-altitude photography under Harold Edgerton. By the end of the war, MIT became the nation’s largest wartime R&D contractor (attracting some criticism of Bush), employing nearly 4000 in the Radiation Laboratory alone and receiving in excess of $100 million ($1.2 billion in 2015 dollars) before 1946. Work on defense projects continued even after then. Post-war government-sponsored research at MIT included SAGE and guidance systems for ballistic missiles and Project Apollo.
 
v. Recent History:-
MIT has kept pace with and helped to advance the digital age. In addition to developing the predecessors to modern computing and networking technologies, students, staff, and faculty members at Project MAC, the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and the Tech Model Railroad Club wrote some of the earliest interactive computer video games like Spacewar! and created much of modern hacker slang and culture.
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Student Services and Facilities:
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Campus:
MIT’s 166-acre (67.2 ha) campus in the city of Cambridge spans approximately a mile along the north side of the Charles River basin.[6] The campus is divided roughly in half by Massachusetts Avenue, with most dormitories and student life facilities to the west and most academic buildings to the east. The bridge closest to MIT is the Harvard Bridge, which is known for being marked off in a non-standard unit of length – the smoot.
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Academics:
MIT is a large, highly residential, research university with a majority of enrollments in graduate and professional programs. The university has been accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges since 1929. MIT operates on a 4–1–4 academic calendar with the fall semester beginning after Labor Day and ending in mid-December, a 4-week “Independent Activities Period” in the month of January, and the spring semester commencing in early February and ceasing in late May.
 
MIT students refer to both their majors and classes using numbers or acronyms alone. Departments and their corresponding majors are numbered in the approximate order of their foundation; for example, Civil and Environmental Engineering is Course 1, while Linguistics and Philosophy is Course 24. Students majoring in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), the most popular department, collectively identify themselves as “Course 6”. MIT students use a combination of the department’s course number and the number assigned to the class to identify their subjects; for instance, the introductory calculus-based classical mechanics course is simply “8.01” at MIT.
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) of Libraries:
The MIT library system consists of five subject libraries: Barker (Engineering), Dewey (Economics), Hayden (Humanities and Science), Lewis (Music), and Rotch (Arts and Architecture). There are also various specialized libraries and archives. The libraries contain more than 2.9 million printed volumes, 2.4 million microforms, 49,000 print or electronic journal subscriptions, and 670 reference databases. The past decade has seen a trend of increased focus on digital over print resources in the libraries. Notable collections include the Lewis Music Library with an emphasis on 20th and 21st-century music and electronic music, the List Visual Arts Center’s rotating exhibitions of contemporary art, and the Compton Gallery’s cross-disciplinary exhibitions. MIT allocates a percentage of the budget for all new construction and renovation to commission and support its extensive public art and outdoor sculpture collection.
 
Activities:
MIT has over 500 recognized student activity groups,[318] including a campus radio station, The Tech student newspaper, an annual entrepreneurship competition, and weekly screenings of popular films by the Lecture Series Committee. Less traditional activities include the “world’s largest open-shelf collection of science fiction” in English, a model railroad club, and a vibrant folk dance scene. Students, faculty, and staff are involved in over 50 educational outreach and public service programs through the MIT Museum, Edgerton Center, and MIT Public Service Center.
 
Athletics:
MIT sponsors 31 varsity sports and has one of the three broadest NCAA Division III athletic programs. MIT participates in the NCAA’s Division III, the New England Women’s and Men’s Athletic Conference, the New England Football Conference, NCAA’s Division I Eastern Association of Women’s Rowing Colleges (EAWRC) for women’s crew, and the Collegiate Water Polo Association (CWPA) for Men’s Water Polo. Men’s crew competes outside the NCAA in the Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges (EARC). The intercollegiate sports teams, called the MIT Engineers won 22 Team National Championships, 42 Individual National Championships. MIT is the all-time Division III leader in producing Academic All-Americas (302) and rank second across all NCAA Divisions only behind the University of Nebraska. MIT Athletes won 13 Elite 90 awards and ranks first among NCAA Division III programs, and third among all divisions. In April 2009, budget cuts led to MIT eliminating eight of its 41 sports, including the mixed men’s and women’s teams in alpine skiing and pistol; separate teams for men and women in ice hockey and gymnastics; and men’s programs in golf and wrestling.
 

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